HOW TO IMPORVE YOUR ACCURACY


There are still players who take great satisfacition in using very little paint to send thier opponents packing to the staging area.

Getting your Paintmarker to Fit Properly

An important of paintball is how well your 'marker fits you. If you can't seem to aim properly or if you start getting cramps in places where you never knew muscles existed, it could be the result of a poorly fitting 'marker.

There are certain dimensions on the paintslinger that should be compatible to certain skeletal and musculature structures.

The Shoulder Stock

The length of the shoulder stock is crucial. If you have a back bottle or bottom line constant air tank, there is little adjusting to be done. You can make it longer, but you can't make it shorter. There are aftermarket, adjustable stocks, that screw into the ASA adaptor. However, they are dependant on you having a vertical bottle, or setting up a remote system. With the thought of extra expenditures, getting one is up to you.

Anyhow, the ideal stock length is very easy to determine. Bend your arm at the elbow, putting your forearm ninety degrees to your upper arm. Now, put the part of the stock that touches your shoulder, against your upper arm. The stock should be lying against your forearm. If the stock is the ideal length you should be able to hold the grip of the 'marker in your hand. You do have some leeway, however. As long as the grip of the 'marker is not past your outstretched fingers, or below the heel of your hand, it's a good length. If the 'marker is a pump and you have short arms, like me, you'll find that a long stock makes it hard to reach out and grab the pump.

Sight Position

Well, it's not really the position of the sights as it is the position of your head when you bring the 'marker up to use the sights. The stock or the constant air tank may get in the way of your face mask. (You ARE wearing a face mask.) There are two ways to solve this. One, is to put the tank on a "bottom-line" setup. This raises the 'marker up as you put the tank to your shoulder. The second way is to raise your sights. There are several raised sight rails to choose from.

Weight and Distribution

A seven-ounce tank weighs slightly over one pound. A full two hundred round loader doesn't weigh that much, but it's not directly over the 'marker. The lighter your 'marker is, and the better you can distribute the weight, the easier it will be on your arm and shoulder muscles. I find vertical bottle setups are good for redistributing weight. Remote systems remove weight. I use twelve grams, so the point is moot for me. A vertical fore grip will help counter the off-balancing of the loader. For the most part, 'markers are pretty light weight. (With the exception of Snipers, Autocockers, VM-68s and KP-3s.) When you start putting loaders, tanks, sights and the like -- it all adds up.

Grip Angle

There's a reason why it's angled, you know. This is not only important for accuracy, it is also important for comfort. If you are having problems with aches in your wrist and forearm, it may be from your grip. There are a lot of after-market grips, for M-16 replacement, and additions to fixed frames like W'Orr Games markers and Automag frames. Make sure the company you buy them from have a return policy. If the new grip doesn't work, you can send it back.

THE BEST WAYS TO IMPROVE ACCURACY

I suppose you figure I’m going to talk about how to hone your barrel? Nope! You suppose I’m going to tell you about barrel lengths? No way! How about muzzle brakes, venting, spiral porting, rifling, power tunes? Nope. Nope. Nope. And nope!

Get thee to the range! That’s what I said, the RANGE! Invest your money and some time for some target practice. I don’t mean ten quick shots at the biggest and closest target, but hours and hundreds of shots.

In addition to shooting aimed shots, you should practice “snap” shooting. This is shooting without using your paintmarkers signs or bringing it to your shoulder.

Fast Fact: Did you know that when you point at something your index finger flawlessly lines up with what you are looking at? This is why you sill hear someone say a paintmarker “points well”. This means the paintmarker’s grip is at an angle where the index finger lines up with the longitudinal axis of the barrel. The ideal angle of the grip is 110 degrees. Luckily, most paintmarker grips are at this angle.

When shooting you must squeeeeeze the trigger. If you jerk, or pull, the trigger your paintmarker will move, ever so slightly. This will send your shot off somewhere else, which is not good, especially if you only had one shot.

You should also know WHEN to shoot and not just HOW. You can be the best shot, west or east of the Pecos, but all the time on the range won’t make up for the fact you are shooting at the wrong times.

If you are shooting when players are moving, or completely behind cover, these are the wrong times to shoot. Sometimes you may have no choice to shoot at a moving target.

AIMING AT A MOVING TARGET

Well, they key to paintball is movement, any your intended target may very well be moving. Many people will say that when engaging moving targets you have to 'lead’ the target. Leading is moving your sights along with, but ahead of, your target.

However, if you have an idea where the target is heading, you don't have to lead. All you have to do is shoot at where the target will be. For instance, say an opponent is running to a bunker from your right to your left. You shoot at the right edge of the bunker if you time it right (and this takes playing experience) your opponent's momentum will carry him into your paintballs.

Shooting "Tricks”

Okay, you've got an opponent popping up from behind cover (a bunker or what-have-you) and giving you grief. Here's how you draw a bead on him, without the aid of his presence. Watch here he pops up, and make note what was directly behind him. Line your sights up on that object, so when he pops up, you're lined up on him. It's an old trick I learned on my Advanced Sniper Course when I was in the infantry.

When shooting at an opponent who is popping in an out, aim as close to the cover as you can. The reason for this is that if you aim at their elbow, for example, they'll pull in when they hear your shot. By the time the paintball gets there, they're halfway behind cover, and the elbow you were aiming at, isn't there anymore. If you aim close to the cover, and he moves when he hears your shot, when he's halfway behind cover, your paintball will connect.


 

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