HOW TO USE PAINTBALL PERSONALITY TYPES EFFECTIVELY AND HOW TO EXPLOIT THEIR WEAKNESSES

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PAINTBALL PERSONALITY TYPES -- PART TWO
How to Exploit Their Weaknesses

For the first part of this artcile, I explained how to use these paintball personality types. What happens if the group you’re playing against has read Part One? Well, I took that into consideration. (Which is why there are TWO parts.)

If you know how to find and exploit their weaknesses, they will become almost ineffectual. (That is unless they are adaptive players, and then you’re pretty much going to be toast. Luckily, adaptive players are the rarest of the rare.)

LONE WOLF: They prey on the unwary and the solitary. Keep your eyes and ears open. Teamwork defeats the Lone Wolf. Have a few players hang back and provide cover, in case Mr. Wolf comes knocking at your back door.

SHARPSHOOTER: Stay well behind cover. Also, thick brush defeats the best marksman. Stay out of wide, open spaces, where the Sharpshooter can do their best. Also, don’t give the Sharpshooter enough time to draw a bead on you, or find a target to shoot at. If a Sharpshooter is being shot at, they’re not going to have the opportunity, or the time, to aim.

RAMBO: Wait until they break cover. When they rush out into the open, that’s when you let them have it. Rambos can be coaxed to charge very easily, with some friendly taunting. Most times, they don’t need coaxing.

HOSER: The Hoser gives away his position. Also, Hoser can be flanked as they are more concerned about shooting, than they are about playing. Like the Sharpshooter, you have to keep things behind cover, or one of those five dozen paintballs he’s streaming your way is going to find their mark.

WINGMAN: Usually Wingmen do not work well alone. Once their partner is eliminated, they usually have no one to mirror. (I was guilty of this, at one time.)

POINTMEN (or WOMEN): If you can get them quickly, they won’t be able to call out your position to their team. Also, Pointment let you know where the opposition will be coming from. They must be eliminated quickly because they are the advance eyes and ears of the opposition.

MOVER: The best way to defeat a mover is to pin them down. If they don’t dare get out from behind cover, they’re not Movers anymore, are they?

SITTER: The best defence is to be more wary. The Sitter will shoot out of ambush. A little healthy paranoia goes a long way.

OLD GUYS: These guys are DEVIOUS. You have to watch these players like a hawk. The Old Guys are hard to handle, and the best thing to do is pin them down, so they can’t do anything devious.

KIDS: Just let them come. Their exuberance causes them to make rash decisions and mistakes.

ADAPTERS: Stay out of their way. They can change from a Lone Wolf, to a Sharpshooter, to a Mover. When all else fails, pin them down.

NEWBIES: They’re not as exuberant as Kids, but they will make mistakes. They also cause a distraction to the more considerate experienced players on their team. If an experienced player is kind enough to help a newbie, his attentions are divided. Also, some Newbies can be easily intimidated by aggressive play.

Of course, all these players are defeated by one tried-and-true method. If they are eliminated from play, you don’t have to worry about them, do you?

While simplistic, these techniques will give you something to build off of when you play. I got the idea from a tourney I recently reffed at. Two tourney players discussing the game they were watching, pointing out what individual players were doing, and coming up with viable options to deal with them. Sitting out an observing a game will teach you more than you would realize.

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